Only Child
Homeschooling an only child doesn't have to be an isolating experience. Rather, it is an excellent way to meet the unique and specific interests and needs of your child in a way that is not possible in a school setting. Here are some strategies to keep you and your child engaged, active, challenged, and involved.
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Only Child: Writers on the Singular Joys and Solitary Sorrows of Growing Up Solo
Only children don’t have to share bedrooms, toys, or the backseat of a car. They don’t have to share allowances, inheritances, or their parents’ attention. But when they get into trouble, they can’t just blame their imaginary friends. In Only Child, twenty-one acclaimed writers tell the truth about life without siblings—the bliss of solitude, the ache of loneliness, and everything in between.

In this unprecedented collection, writers like Judith Thurman, Kathryn Harrison, John Hodgman, and Peter Ho Davies reflect on the single, transforming episode that defined each of them as an only child. For some it came while lurking around the edges of a friend’s boisterous family, longing to be part of the chaos. For others, it came in sterile hospital halls, while single-handedly caring for a parent with cancer. They write about the parents who raised them, from the devoted to the dismissive. They describe what it’s like to be an only child of divorce, an only because of the death of a sibling, an only who reveled in it or an only who didn’t.

In candid, poignant, and often hilarious essays, these authors—including the children of Erica Jong, Alice Walker, and Phyllis Rose—explore a lifetime of onliness. As adults searching for partners, they are faced with the unique challenge of trying to turn a longtime trio into a quartet. In deciding whether to give junior a sib, they weigh the benefits of producing the friend they never had against the fear that they will not know how to divide their love and attention among multiples. As they watch their parents age, they come face-to-face with the onus of being their family’s sole historian.

Whether you’re an only child curious about how your experiences compare to others’, the partner or spouse of an only, a parent pondering whether to stop at one, or someone with siblings who’s always wondered how the other half lives, Only Child offers a look behind the scenes and into the hearts of twenty-one smart and sensitive writers as they reveal the truth about growing up—and being a grown-up—solo.


From the Hardcover edition.
Homeschooling an Only Child
Is homeschooling good for your only child?
Many parents of single children toy with the idea of homeschooling their child at least once during their child’s tenure at school. The trend of homeschooling is indeed catching on with growth rate of 7 to 15 percent per year. It is estimated that there are currently two million children coming under the homeschooling program. They are reported to be performing on par with regular schoolchildren at college, universities and at work.
Homeschooling an Only Child
Do you homeschool an only child? Despite the horrific stereotypes, educating your singleton at home is a great option. Enjoy this youtube video presented by Jimmie Lanley, describing these stereotypes and countering them.
Blogs about Homeschooling an Only Child
I Am a Princess, All Girls Are
This lovely blog chronicles the journey of a grandmother homeschooling a single granddaughter.
Our Homeschool Reviews
This blog shares the experience of homeschooling an only child.
A Learning Journey
This homeschooling journey is shared by a mom who is homeschooling her only child.
Ozark Ramblings
This blog chronicles the joys of raising and homeschooling an only son.
Cabin in the Woods
Diane Knect is homeschooling an only child. Share her experiences with raising her daughter Grace in a homeschooling small family.
Support for Those Homeschooling a Single Child
HOOville
Homeschooling offers special challenges (as well as blessings) to those who have only one student. Find help and camaraderie in "HOOville." HOO = Homeschooling Only One.
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